Events

Capitol Hill Ocean Week 2020

When:

9 Jun, 2020

Where:

The Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center
1300 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Washington, DC 20004
Contact Us

Convened by the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation every June, Capitol Hill Ocean Week brings together national and global stakeholders to address pressing science, conservation, and management issues facing our ocean and Great Lakes.

This year’s conference takes place over two days and includes high-level plenaries from ocean visionaries and breakout sessions for deeper discussions. The 2020 conference will focus on the importance of biodiversity to our ocean and Great Lakes.

Registration

Capitol Hill Ocean Week 2020: Biodiversity

The breadth of life in our ocean and Great Lakes is astounding. From tiny plankton to giant whales, marine species form complex systems that work in a delicate balance with one another. Earth’s biodiversity — simply put: the variety of life on Earth, from single genes to entire ecosystems — is at risk.

Our planet faces a major biodiversity crisis: with extinction rates at their highest since the loss of the dinosaurs 66 million years ago. One million species — including more than a third of reef-forming corals, sharks and shark relatives, and marine mammals, are projected to disappear unless we come together for fundamental, structural change. Our reliance on a healthy ocean and Great Lakes means that the current biodiversity crisis will have powerful consequences for people and communities.

This year, from the UN Ocean Conference in Lisbon, Portugal to the IUCN World Conservation Congress in Marseille, France and the Convention on Biological Diversity in Kunming, China, governments, non-governmental organizations, corporations, communities, and individuals are focusing on how to address the biodiversity crisis and inspire action to build a sustainable global economy that protects nature. Capitol Hill Ocean Week 2020 is the opportunity for people from across the U.S. to engage in the dialogue on actions we can take to conserve the variety of life on Earth for the long-term health of our communities and the planet.

2020 Plenaries

June 9 Opening Plenary

Biodiversity Conservation:  Learning from the Past, Managing for the Future

CHOW’s opening plenary will bring together an inspiring group of authors to discuss how our use of natural resources is changing the planet and how we can make the conservation of biodiversity an integral part of sustainable development.

 

June 9 Closing Plenary

Margaret Davidson Emerging Leaders: New Perspectives on Conserving Nature

What does biodiversity loss mean for us and what actions can we take to turn the trajectory around? During this plenary, we will hear from emerging voices in science, technology, and conservation on why we need to conserve a variety of life on earth, our role in stewardship of nature, and how we can integrate biodiversity protection into our economy.

 

June 10 Opening Plenary

Defining Priorities for Meaningful Protection

Despite the expansion of protected waters worldwide, we continue to lose species and habitats at an ever-accelerating rate.  How can we effectively restore and protect marine and freshwater areas to halt this trend?

 

June 10 Closing Plenary

Biodiversity on the High Seas

The high seas and seabed areas beyond national jurisdiction cover almost two-thirds of our ocean. Yet these areas and the biodiversity contained within them are not protected by national laws.  A global effort is underway to determine how nations can join together in the governance of these waters. The CHOW Closing Plenary considers opportunities and potential solutions in this space where the rules are still being written.

2020 Tracks and Topics

Conference Track #1: Community Stewardship

The ocean and Great Lakes shape our cultural identity, quality of life and our economies. Coastal communities thrived on surrounding natural resources and explorers followed fish, whales, and other stocks to all four corners of the globe.  Trade routes, crisscrossing our ocean and Great Lakes, carried this harvest to distant shores. Our waters represent a valuable source of natural wealth and an avenue for cultural exchange. Today, these resources are under threat. How do our beliefs, attitudes, and values influence how we use and conserve natural resources?  This track will explore the connections between culture and our changing ocean and Great Lakes.

 

Conference Track #2: Protecting Marine and Great Lakes Biodiversity 

Freshwater and marine ecosystems face significant threats in an increasingly crowded, busy environment.   Non-governmental organizations, corporations, and communities are focusing on actions to protect more of nature.  This track will delve into the latest efforts and explore how we can apply new approaches and work collaboratively to protect biodiversity and restore habitat and species.

 

Conference Track #3: Science and Technology 

Measuring biodiversity over time and space and protecting it for the future presents an enormous challenge. However, new advances in science and technology are painting a clearer picture of the state of our ocean and Great Lakes. Learn how improvements in technologies are helping us better monitor, map and explore marine and freshwater environments, understand changes and strengthen management to protect biodiversity.  

Schedule

  • 9:00am – 9:30 am: Opening Remarks
  • 9:30am – 10:30am: OPENING PLENARY: Ocean Disrupted
  • Climate change is having widespread disruptive impacts on the ocean, coasts and Great Lakes and the communities who rely on them. Learn more about what the Fourth National Climate Assessment and the IPCC Special Report are telling us about the impacts of climate change on the ocean and its ecosystems and actions needed to minimize risks.
    • Location
      • Auditorium
    • Opening Remarks
      • The Honorable Suzanne Bonamici, US House of Representatives, OR-01
      • The Honorable Chellie Pingree, US House of Representatives, ME-01
    • Closing Remarks
      • The Honorable Jared Huffman, US House of Representatives, CA-02
    • Moderator
      • Dr. Sarah Cooley, Director, Ocean Acidification Program, Ocean Conservany
    • Speakers
      • Dr. Andrew Pershing, Chief Scientific Officer, Gulf of Maine Research Institute
      • Dr. John Bruno, Professor, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
      • Ms. Ko Barrett, Vice Chair, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
      • Dr. Marcia McNutt, President, National Academy of Science
      • Mr. David Victor, Co-Chair, Cross Brookings Initiative on Energy and Climate, Brookings Institution
  • 10:30am – 11:00am: Break for Networking and Exhibits (Lobby)
  • 11:00am – 12:15pm: Breathing Easier in Port Cities
  • International maritime shipping drives global commerce by transporting approximately 90 percent of the world’s goods. These vessels are a source of increasing air emissions that harm human health and the environment. Learn how efforts to improve fuel standards, reduce vessel speeds, and implement pollution control measures are moving the bar toward improved air quality for port cities, mitigating against climate change, and reducing whale mortality from ship strikes.
    • Location
      • Hemisphere A
    • Opening Remarks
      • The Honorable Salud Carbajal, US House of Representatives, CA-24
      • Mr. Patrick Ramage, Director, Marine Conservation, International Fund for Animal Welfare
    • Moderator
      • Mr. Eric Olson, Senior Advisor, Clean Cargo Working Group, Business for Social Responsibility
    • Speakers
      • Ms. Aeron Arlin Genet, District Director, Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District
      • Mr. Paul Billings, National Senior Vice President, Advocacy, American Lung Association
      • Mr. Giles Pettifor, Environmental Manager, Port Hueneme
  • 11:00am – 12:15pm: Addressing the US Seafood Deficit
  • By value, nearly 90 percent of the seafood Americans eat comes from abroad. Experts have debated the best way to address the growing domestic demand for seafood. This panel will explore the causes and proposed solutions to address this issue alongside fishermen, restaurateurs, and economists.
    • Location
      • Auditorium
    • Moderator 
      • Ms. Linda Cornish, President, Seafood Nutrition Partnership
    • Speakers

      • Dr. Marty Smith, George M. Woodwell Distinguished Professor of Environmental Economics, Duke Nicholas School of the Environment and Department of Economics at Duke University
      • Mr. Bill Dimento, Vice President Corporate Sustainability and Government Affairs, High Liner Foods
      • Mr. Brett Veerhusen, Principal, Ocean Strategies Inc., and Alaskan Commercial Fisherman
  • 11:00am – 12:15pm: Protected Areas in a Changing Climate
  • Climate change is shifting species composition, habitat and migration patterns in our ocean and Great Lakes. Protected areas are one of the primary ways to conserve biodiversity, but these special places and the species that call them home are increasingly impacted by climate change. This panel features experts who are investigating dynamic management of our protected areas.
    • Location
      • Hemisphere B
    • Opening Remarks
      • The Honorable Jimmy Panetta, US House of Representatives, CA-20
    • Moderator
      • Ms. Nicole LeBoeuf, Acting Assistant Administrator, NOAA’s National Ocean Service
    • Speakers
      • Ms. Francesca Koe, Program Chair, Greater Farallones Association
      • Ms. Fatou Ndoye, Deputy Director, UN Environment’s North America Regional Office
      • Mr. Kalani Quiocho, Native Hawaiian Program Specialist, Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, NOAA
  • 12:25*pm – 1:15pm : Lunch session: Increasing diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) in the marine, coastal and ocean science workforce
  • In partnership, the Women’s Aquatic Network (WAN) and Sea Grant are hosting a brown bag lunch discussion on increasing diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) in the marine, coastal and ocean science workforce. Recent technological breakthroughs, changes in demographics and societal trends, and climate change are impacting the ocean, marine and coastal science workforce. The opportunities offered by these changes can be captured by the full and complete participation of women, minorities and people with disabilities who are trained with skills of the 21st century. Capitalizing opportunities offered by these changes will also require managing a diverse workforce and fostering respectful and inclusive work environments. This session will focus on changing workforce trends, and the challenges and opportunities that they offer with respect to the participation of women, minorities and people with disabilities in ocean, marine, and coastal science. This discussion is made possible with generous support provided by Sea Grant, Women’s Aquatic Network, Coastal States Organization, and the National Parks Conservation Association.

         *Please bring your lunch or grab a quick lunch at the RRB Center and join us for this casual and open lunch hour panel discussion.  

  • 1:15pm -2:15pm: AFTERNOON PLENARY: Transforming the Global Seafood Market
  • With more than 3 billion people dependent on the ocean for their primary source of animal protein, establishing a sustainable, global seafood market is more critical than ever. Explore efforts to transform business practices, protect human rights, and maintain food security to ensure a thriving ocean.
    • Location 
      • Auditorium
    • Opening Remarks

      • RDML Timothy Gallaudet, PhD., Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and Deputy NOAA Administrator
    • Moderator
      • Ms. Heather Ludemann, Program Officer, Conservation and Science, David and Lucille Packard Foundation
    • Speakers

      • Ms. Patima Tungpuchayakul, Founder, Labor Rights Protection Network
      • Ms. Teresa Ish, Program Officer, Environment Program, Walton Family Foundation
      • Mr. Troy Knapp, Executive Chef, Park Hyatt Washington
      • Mr. Richard Stavis, Chief Sustainability Officer, Stavis Seafoods
  •  2:15pm – 2:45pm: BREAK: Networking and Exhibits (Lobby)
  • 2:45pm – 4:00pm: Toxins in the Aquatic Environment
  • Coastal communities are feeling the impacts of harmful algal blooms’ increasing length and severity. Public health officials are partnering with marine and Great Lakes agencies to better understand when, where and why waterborne illnesses occur. This panel will explore lessons learned from collaboration and how public health officials are helping managers to maximize their impact.
    • Location
      • Hemisphere B
    • Moderator
      • Mr. Tom Henry, Staff Writer, Toledo Blade
    • Speakers
      • Mr. Noah Oppenheim, Executive Director, Pacific Coast Federation of Fisheries Associations, Institute for Fisheries Resources
      • Mr. Todd Brennan, Senior Policy Manager, Alliance for the Great Lakes
      • Dr. Kate Hubbard, Research Scientist, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
      • Dr. Mike Focazio, Program Coordinator, USGS Environmental Health Mission Area
  • 2:45pm – 4:00pm: Combating Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated Fishing
  • From illegal entry into sovereign waters to fostering organized crime, illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing poses a number of significant threats to national and ecological security. Hear how innovators are finding solutions to address the challenges posed by IUU fishing.
    • Location
      • Auditorium
    • Opening Remarks

      • Philip Stephenson, Chair, Board of Trustees, The Philip Stephenson Foundation
    • Moderator
      • Dr. Whitley Saumweber, Director, Stephenson Ocean Security Project, CSIS
    • Speakers

      • Ms. Sally Yozell, Fellow and Senior Director of the Stimson Center
      • Mr. Johan Bergenas, Director for Public Policy, Vulcan
      • Mr. Peter Neil, Director, World Ocean Observatory
      • Ms. Roberta Elias, Deputy Director of Marine Fisheries Policy, World Wildlife Fund
  • 2:45pm – 4:00pm: The State of Shark and Ray Conservation
  • Sharks and rays are some of the ocean’s most iconic species, and yet they face a number of threats from habitat loss, bycatch and targeted fishing efforts. From international treaties to protecting domestic stocks, this panel will explore scientists’ efforts to learn more about sharks and rays, improve their protections, and change public perception about their role in the ecosystem.
    • Location
      • Hemisphere A
    • Opening Remarks
      • The Honorable Michael McCaul, US House of Representatives, TX-10
      • Dr. Michael Heithaus, Dean of the FIU College of Arts, Sciences & Education, Florida International University
    • Moderator
      • Mr. Lee Crockett, Director, Shark Conservation Fund
    • Speakers

      • Guy Stevens, PhD, Chief Executive, The Manta Trust
      • Dr. Michael Heithaus, Dean, College of Arts, Sciences and Education, Florida International University
      • Ms. Alejandra Goyenchea, Senior International Council, Defenders of Wildlife
      • Ms. Jen Sawada, Manager, Global Shark Conservation, The Pew Charitable Trusts
  • 9:00am – 9:10am : Opening Remarks
  • 9:10am – 9:30am : Heartwired to Love the Ocean
  • People don’t just love the ocean — they are heartwired to love the ocean.Working with dozens of conservation organizations, Amy Simon, founding partner at Goodwin Simon Strategic Research, and Robert Pérez, chief exploration officer at Wonder: Strategies for Good, embarked on a broad, three-year audience research project to better understand how to develop new messaging recommendations that organizations can use to strengthen public support for ocean protection.Amy and Robert came to learn through deep audience research that people across the country from all walks of life — diverse in terms of race, ethnicity, gender, age, faith, geography and politics — care deeply about the ocean. The ocean is a cherished place — in ways both nostalgic and aspirational — that provides opportunities for creating treasured memories, transmitting family traditions and values, and is vital for people’s livelihoods. The ocean brings personal and psychological healing to many, as well as a chance for self-reflection and connecting spiritually to God and/or nature.Amy and Robert will share some insights about what they learned and what it means for the future of conservation communications. They will also let you know how you can get a free copy of Heartwired to Love the Ocean, a new messaging guide designed to help advocates understand how to put these learnings into practice.
    • Location
      • Auditorium
    • Speakers

      • Amy Simon, Founding Partner, Goodwin Simon Strategic Research
      • Robert Pérez, Chief Exploration Officer, Wonder: Strategies for Good
  • 9:30am – 10:30am : Morning Plenary: Margaret Davidson Emerging Leaders
  • Margaret Davidson was an ocean visionary dedicated to fostering early-career leaders and tackling ocean and coastal issues with unwavering determination and innovation. In her honor, CHOW 2019 hosts the next generation of leaders who are tackling the issue of climate change through innovative thinking about communication, energy development and ocean conservation.
    • Location
      • Auditorium
    • Opening Remarks
      • The Honorable Sheldon Whitehouse, US Senate, Rhode Island
      • The Honorable Scott Peters, US House of Representatives, CA-52
    • Moderator

      • Dr. Margaret Leinen, Vice Chancellor for Marine Science, Scripps Institute of Oceanography
    • Speakers
      • Dr. Desiree Tommasi, Project Scientist, University of California and NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center
      • Ms. Surili Patel, Deputy Director, Center for Public Health Policy, American Public Health Association
      • Ms. Coleen Jose, Visual Storyteller and Multimedia Journalist
      • Mr. Kalani Quiocho, Native Hawaiian Program Specialist, Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, NOAA
  • 10:30am – 11:00am: BREAK – Networking and Exhibits
  • 11:00am – 12:15pm : Over the Counter Conservation
  • For thousands of years, humans have explored nature and used plants and animals to develop products that improve our lives and health and fight disease. Our ocean, which is the most diverse and complex biological community, holds tremendous potential for discovery of new products. Efforts to harvest products from the ocean can both aid in the conservation of marine area but also lead to the overharvest of resources and illegal wildlife trafficking. Learn how scientists and industry are promoting sustainable use of products while conserving resources.
    • Location
      • Hemisphere B
    • Moderator

      • Dr. Flora Katz, Director, Division of International Training and Research, Fogarty International Center at the National Institutes of Health
    • Speakers
      • Ms. Tamara Schwent, Director of Operations, Sirenas Marine Discovery
      • Dr. Amy Wright, Principal Investigator, Florida Atlantic University
      • Dr. Paul Sandifer, Director, Center for Coastal Environmental and Human Health, College of Charleston
  • 11:00am – 02:00pm : Giving Voice to the Ocean: How Policy and Effective Communication Intersect on Capitol Hill sponsored by COMPASS and Consortium for Ocean Leadership
  • Learn more about the ocean science priorities of the 116th Congress as well as how to effectively communicate your issues and concerns with congressional representatives. This multi-part session will provide insights on key federal ocean science issues, effective methods to communicate, and insights from capitol hill staff on how to best connect with them and their priorities.The Consortium for Ocean Leadership (COL) will describe the intersection of science and policy. Learn about the role of COL’s members in making key scientific and technological advances and how these inform legislative priorities, such as the National Oceanographic Partnership Program, ocean science funding, and aquaculture that grow our ocean understanding and ensure our ocean security.Learn practical skills from Science Communication experts at COMPASS how to be clear, compelling and concise in communicating your key ideas to policymakers on Capitol Hill and beyond.Engage in a lively discussion with an expert panel who will offer their perspectives on how science and evidence is used on Capitol Hill and how to work with Congress and policy makers to make lasting change.*Please bring your lunch or grab a quick lunch at the RRB Center prior to starting this session.
  • 11:00am – 12:15pm : Building Resilient Fishing Communities
  • Fisheries and fishery-dependent communities are expected to experience major impacts due to climate change. By understanding how these changes will affect fish stocks, managers can better predict availability of resources and help fishing communities adapt. Learn about efforts to incorporate climate knowledge into fisheries science and management.
    • Location
      • Hemisphere A
    • Moderators 
      • Mr. Christopher Brown, President, Seafood Harvesters of America and President, Rhode Island Commercial Fisherman’s Association
    • Speakers
      • Ms. Diani Taylor, General Council, Taylor Shellfish Company, Inc.
      • Mr. Ed Johnstone, Fisheries Policy Spokesperson, Quinault Indian Nation
      • Dr. David Pierce, Director, Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries
      • Dr. Desiree Tommasi, Project Scientist, University of California and NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center
  • 11:00am – 12:15pm : Advancing Conservation with Zoos and Aquariums
  • Zoos and aquariums are crucial partners in marine conservation. They allow people to encounter marine wildlife, they tell the stories of the ocean and Great Lakes through their research and education efforts, and they help us conserve species. Hear how zoos and aquariums are engaging in conservation efforts and increasing their conservation outcomes through outreach campaigns, cutting edge research, and partnerships.
    • Location
      • Auditorium
    • Moderator

      • Ms. Aimee David, Director of Ocean Conservation Policy Strategies, Monterey Bay Aquarium
    • Speakers
      • Mr. Andrew Wood, Chief Operating Officer, Florida Aquarium
      • Ms. Andrea Densham, Senior Director of Conservation Policy and Advocacy, Shedd Aquarium
      • Ms. Charmaine Dahlenburg, Manager, Chesapeake Bay Program, National Aquarium
      • Mr. Jon Forrest Dohlin, Vice President, Wildlife Conservation Society
  • 12:15pm – 1:15pm : Lunch, Networking, and Exhibits
  • 1:15pm – 2:15pm : Ocean 2050
  • By 2050, the global population is expected to reach 9.7 billion. With an increasing number of people depending on the ocean, what can be done to prepare for the strain on its resources? Panelists will examine food security, climate refugees, and marine debris as three case studies in preparing for the future ocean.
    • Location
      • Hemisphere B
    • Opening Remarks
      • The Honorable Francis Rooney, US House of Representatives, FL-19
      • Ms. Missy Owens, Director, Government Relations Federal and Diplomatic, The Coca-Cola Company
    • Closing Remarks
      • The Honorable Ed Case, US House of Representatives, HI-01
    • Moderator
      • Ms. Jean Flemma, Founding Member, Ocean Collectiv
    • Speakers
      • Mr. Grant Collins, Consultant, Circulate Capital
      • Ms. Kate Brown, Executive Director, Global Island Partnership
      • Dr. Andrew Rosenberg, Director, Center for Science and Democracy, Union of Concerned Scientists
      • Ms. Heather Conley, Senior Vice President for Europe, Eurasia, and the Arctic, Center for Strategic and International Studies
  • 1:15pm – 2:15pm : Recreational Fishers as Conservation Partners
  • Recreational fishing is an American pastime. From advocating for clean water and ecosystem protection to stewarding our next generation of conservationists, sport fishermen are important partners in ensuring sustainable fisheries. This panel will explore conservation efforts of recreational fishermen in our ocean and Great Lakes and ways to improve recreational fishing management.
    • Location
      • Hemisphere A
    • Moderator
      • Ms. Jessica Harvey, Angler, Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation
    • Speakers
      • Mr. John McMurray, American Saltwater Guides Association
      • Dr. John Mandelman, Vice President and Chief Scientist, New England Aquarium
      • Ms. Erin Willhoft, Sportsmen Outreach Coordinator, Mississippi River Delta Restoration, National Wildlife Federation
      • Mr. David Sikorski, Executive Director, Coastal Conservation Association Maryland
  • 1:15pm – 2:15pm : Whale Conservation in the 21st Century
  • From entanglement to ship strikes to changing habitat conditions, humans play an important role in conserving whales across the globe. Technologies like drones, artificial intelligence, and ropeless fishing gear are making it easier for researchers and managers to study and protect whales. This panel will examine new applications for existing technologies in the fight for whale conservation.
    • Location
      • Auditorium
    • Opening Remarks
      • Dr. Peter Thomas, Executive Director, Marine Mammal Commission
    • Moderator
      • Dr. Peter Thomas, Executive Director, Marine Mammal Commission
    • Speakers

      • Dr. Tracy Romano, Ph.D., Vice President of Biological Research and Chief Scientist, Mystic Aquarium
      • Mr. Ed Lyman, Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary
      • Mr. Keith Ellenbogen, Assistant Professor of Photography, Fashion Institute of Technology and Visiting Artist, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Sea Grant
      • Dr. Michael Moore, Senior Scientist, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
  • 2:15pm – 2:45pm : BREAK – Networking and Exhibits
  • 2:45pm – 4:00pm : Closing Plenary – Powering Our Future
  • As energy needs continue to grow globally, siting decisions, seismic testing, and infrastructure development will require balancing different ocean user needs and protecting ocean, coastal and Great Lakes ecosystems and wildlife.
    How can we plan for the energy growth of the future while minimizing and mitigating harm to our marine and Great Lakes environment?

    • Location
      • Auditorium
    • Moderator
      • Mr. Tommy Beaudreau, Partner, Latham & Watkins, LLP
    • Speakers

      • Nancy Sopko, Co-Director, University of Delaware Special Initiative on Offshore Wind
      • Kevin Knobloch, President, Anbaric’s New York-New Jersey OceanGrid
      • Tim Charters, Vice President, Government and Political Affairs, National Ocean Industries Association
      • Alejandro Moreno, Director, U.S. Department of Energy’s Water Power Technologies Office

Capitol Hill Ocean Week 2019 Sponsors

Roger and Victoria Sant Trust in Honor of Dr. Nancy Knowlton | Drs. Nancy Knowlton and Jeremy Jackson |  Dane Nichols | John and Nancy Rudolf | Perkins Coie Foundation / Don Baur | Robert and Kathleen Trainor | B. Holt Thrasher | Friends of Kris Sarri

*Support from governmental organizations only supports the Capitol Hill Ocean Week Conference and does not support the Ocean Awards Gala

17th Annual Ocean Awards Gala Sponsors

Cocktail Reception

Dessert Reception

Table Sponsors

Roger and Victoria Sant Trust in Honor of Dr. Nancy Knowlton | Drs. Nancy Knowlton and Jeremy Jackson | Dane Nichols | John and Nancy Rudolf | Perkins Coie Foundation / Don Baur | Robert and Kathleen Trainor | B. Holt Thrasher | Friends of Kris Sarri

Sustainable Seafood Generously Provided by

Gala Signature Cocktail Crafted by

Sponsorship and Table Purchase Opportunities

For sponsorship information Click here!

 

(Tickets and sponsorships are non-refundable. In the event of cancellation your purchase becomes a tax deductible gift.)

Contact us